How fast do you type? Check your WPM here!

Random words at Monkeytype.com.
(Logitech Keyboard K120, rubber dome).

A meaningful text at TypingClub.com with the same keyboard.

2 Likes

Looks like my speed is increasing :rofl:

I wonder if we should make this a daily or weekly thing - maybe it will help improve our speeds :upside_down_face:

I will try that site DG!

2 Likes

Yes, use Typing Club. You’d like it.
I learnt to type with Mavis Beacon Typing Tutor when I was in my first year of university. Recently I discovered Typing Club, I use it now and then, and I love it.

2 Likes

Wow. Almost 100 wpm with 100% accuracy. That’s blazing fast! :fast_forward:

3 Likes

Thank you! :slight_smile:
The secret is to work on accuracy (and rhythm) and the speed will come itself. Mavis Beacon Typing Tutor also had a game for typing in rhythm.
Between accuracy and rhythm, accuracy is more important.

Typing Club is a good alternative to those typing tutor applications/games like Mavis Beacon Typing Tutor.

2 Likes

What Poll: Which keyboard layout do you use? DG?

100wpm at 100% is indeed excellent!

I am going to set myself a goal of 70 to 80 wpm - only thing is going to Ortho and a 40% is going to ensure I won’t be reaching those speeds any time soon :rofl:

2 Likes

I use Qwerty layout. I once thought of learning Dvorak (as my brother uses it and is quiet happy with it), but I was afraid that it will require a lot of work to make Vim work with the new layout especially Vim emulators for Sublime/VSCode.

I think 60 wpm is enough for programming and almost all of the other tasks. While we code or write a post/letter/email, we often have to think about what we’re writing and we tend to type at 40 wpm to 50 wpm or 60 wpm at most.

2 Likes

Yeah I read that Dvorak can be a nuisance for things like copy and paste (why some people prefer Colemak).

I think my typing speeds would actually be pretty good - if I had a decent keyboard where the keys don’t feel so cramped! I think I might experiment with a couple of different keyboards as I do have a feeling a Planck may also feel a bit cramped… but… I have never tried touch typing before so maybe I will feel differently : /

I also think part of the reason I do not touch type on this keyboard is because of accidental presses when ‘resting’. I don’t really want to have to ‘float’ about the keyboard but let me fingers rest on it if possible (maybe I will need to look into switches to will suit me better for this too!)

2 Likes

I think Qwerty is good enough once you practice a bit.

When I was learning to type for the first time, I had a rubber dome keyboard, a Model M keyboard from IBM, and a similar (buckling spring) keyboard from Dell.

I used two of the mechanical keyboards but I didn’t like those two. I gifted one to my brother and another one to a cousin. I use rubber dome keyboards predominantly. Of course rubber dome keyboards need to be replaced sooner than mechanical keyboards.

I also like laptop’s builtin keyboards, like those in HP Pavilions and Macbooks before 2015, but I couldn’t find an external keyboard of a similar quality and feel.

I think a full-size keyboard with a palm rest will work for you.

3 Likes

Completely blown away by the keyboard on the new Macbook Air. After hating the built in keyboard for the past three macs I’ve had this one is really nice. Also tried the Monkeytype on it and compared to my mechanical keyboard, surprisingly was typing at roughly the same speed/accuracy on the both (with the keyboard on my old MBP some 10-15 wpm behind).

Macbook AIr 2020:

Varmilo V69M:

Macbook Pro 2017:

3 Likes

I really like the new Mac laptop keyboards too - I think I would actually be pretty happy with my 16" MBP’s keyboard as a standalone unit, it’s much nicer than this Apple Magic KB 2 (I seem to make less mistakes with it as I think it is very slightly spaced out more and the keypresses are more sensitive and provide better feedback).

111wpm at 99% is excellent - think you’re our current champ :smiley: Do you touch type?

I think that’s what I am going to go for, but it’s just so time consuming trying to find a good mechanical keyboard that isn’t sold out!! Think I might have found one tho… will post if I order it :upside_down_face:

1 Like

Yes, touch typing (with QWERTY layout), with mostly correct finger setting, though I very often cheat on P and hit it with my right ring finger instead of the pinky :slight_smile:.

3 Likes

On the new MacBook Pro

4 Likes

Wow, that’s impressive. I’m quite happy with my own result but you’re definitely ahead. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

Typed on a Das Keyboard 4 Professional

4 Likes


That’s amazing!


That’s a very good progress. Looks like you’ll easily reach to 90-95 after getting used to this new keyboard. I’ll also advise working on accuracy. If your accuracy reach to 99 or 100, you’ll be typing at 100 wpm.

He might have reached to 125 to 135, if he hadn’t committed those 1% of mistakes.

3 Likes

Does MonkeyType allow the creation of ‘clans’ or teams? It would be great to have a running leaderboard :laughing:

2 Likes

With an old and dusty Cherry Mx 1800 branded as Lauer Fischer. Its layout differs a lot from the US layout.
100 wpm with a typo, (typed vary instead of very. :slight_smile:).

4 Likes

Is it like this:

Looks pretty neat :sunglasses:

2 Likes

Yes, it’s exactly like the one in this picture, but in black color. And yes, it’s a nice keyboard, but it’s not US layout.

I have another old model from Cherry. It’s Cherry Mx 8100 (brown switches). I use it sometimes. This text is also written with that keyboard. :slight_smile:

When I learnt to touch type one and a half decade ago, I had many keyboards, including IBM model M and a keyboard from Dell with the same buckling spring technology.

3 Likes

4 Likes