A Common-Sense Guide to Data Structures and Algorithms, Second Edition (PragProg)

Algorithms and data structures are much more than abstract concepts. Mastering them enables you to write code that runs faster and more efficiently, which is particularly important for today’s web and mobile apps.

Jay Wengrow @jaywengrow

edited by Brian MacDonald @bmacdonald

Algorithms and data structures are much more than abstract concepts. Mastering them enables you to write code that runs faster and more efficiently, which is particularly important for today’s web and mobile apps. Take a practical approach to data structures and algorithms, with techniques and real-world scenarios that you can use in your daily production code, with examples in JavaScript, Python, and Ruby. This new and revised second edition features new chapters on recursion, dynamic programming, and using Big O in your daily work.

Use Big O notation to measure and articulate the efficiency of your code, and modify your algorithm to make it faster. Find out how your choice of arrays, linked lists, and hash tables can dramatically affect the code you write. Use recursion to solve tricky problems and create algorithms that run exponentially faster than the alternatives. Dig into advanced data structures such as binary trees and graphs to help scale specialized applications such as social networks and mapping software. You’ll even encounter a single keyword that can give your code a turbo boost. Practice your new skills with exercises in every chapter, along with detailed solutions.

Use these techniques today to make your code faster and more scalable.


Don’t forget you can get 35% off with your Devtalk discount! Just use the coupon code “devtalk.com" at checkout :+1:

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Hello everyone! Jay Wengrow, the author, here.

If you’ve bought A Common-Sense Guide to Data Structures, Second Edition, thank you! I hope you enjoy it.

I’m looking forward to being part of the conversation around the book and other related topics. I also encourage you to connect me with on LinkedIn.

-Jay

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Hi! It’s Jay, the author.

I recently wrote my reflections about writing this book, and writing programming books in general. Hopefully it’ll inspire someone else to take the plunge and write a book!

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Hi Jay,

I loved reading about your experience with writing a book and working with The Pragmatic Bookshelf! Aside from just letting others know that it is possible to write a book even if you don’t think of yourself as an author, do you have any other advice? For example, if you had it to do over again, would you have presented the idea to a publisher at an earlier stage (now knowing that you get a dedicated developmental editor to help)?
Thanks for your insight!
Margaret

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Hi Margaret,

It’s nice to meet you! Those are great questions - and maybe fodder for a future post.

But yes, I learned that I could make a proposal way earlier than having a full-fledged manuscript. If you have a great topic that you have a passion to write (and learn!) about, that’s all you need to submit a proposal.

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Good news, readers! @jaywengrow has a new web site up for #book-a-common-sense-guide-to-data-structures-and-algorithms-second-edition. Check it out here: https://commonsensecomputerscience.com

Included on the site:

Articles

Includes articles on topics not covered in the book. This is a great way to explore new subjects in the same common-sense approach as you enjoyed in the book.

First-Edition Exercises

Exercises created for the first edition, which didn’t include exercises in the actual book. Note that the second edition’s exercises are much better, and come with solutions.

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