What dev-related stuff have you been up to?

Not only can use the laser scanners to scan ID’s for the tracking system I built above, but also can scan via a video stream now too, fully mobile friendly website (a phone scans faster than the laser scanner now interestingly!).

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I am currently finalizing an internal project for my company. A Kanban system exclusively for sales and service management via WhatsApp. I am using Phoenix LiveView for this application :smile:

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I’ve been building ‘yet-another’ Rust ECS library (a port of my old C++ 90’s ECS) in the very little free time that I get… ^.^;

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Lately I’ve seen the keyword “Rust” pop up more and more, so maybe I should finally see why everyone likes it so much? :thinking:

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learning Phoenix by building uber simple pexel-like site

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Building simple html/json scrapers with elixir. Sometimes you get to take a nice shortcut with pattern matching, other times it’s time for regex :smile_cat:

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Now that Devon Estes has released Muzak, I’ve been starting to look into that, trying to learn more about more mutation testing tools. So far I’m mainly familiar with Mutant (Ruby) but am now looking into Muzak (Elixir), Stryker (JavaScript and others), and Mutmut (Python).

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I have been learning more about Elixir releases in order to construct a general-purpose Dockerfile to support production, development, and testing environments.

Think different and code well,

-Conrad

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I don’t want to show myself as disrespectful but after reading the article I am not sure I can see what’s the benefit of mutation testing compared to property testing. Sure, property testing approaches the problem from the other end – namely figuring out the properties that make your program valid and trying to to test for them, thus making error states more visible (and it has saved my bum several times in the past!) – but beyond the different approach I am not sure I see any benefits to mutation testing. It feels more like automated cracking.

I am likely missing something. Do you have any insights?

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Have you made any progress?
Nerves is very interesting and I’d like to try it, just I’d need a lot of time :smiley:

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Mainly, they are looking for two different things. Property testing finds edge cases and other such special cases. Mutation testing finds insufficiently tested (maybe totally untested) code, which means either you’re missing some tests, or the code is not really needed. These are very different things, both useful. Granted, a “hit” from property testing (an edge/special case) is much more immediately useful in correcting incorrect code, than one from mutation testing (a “surviving mutant”), but it may take much longer to find.

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I see, haven’t thought of it this way. Thought it was more like fuzzing but I was wrong.

Thank you.

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I’m working on a project with a hybrid front-end (app) and backed by Phoenix. It’s consuming all of my time and I have to put everything I was learning aside, till it ends.

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I’ve been learning Elixir these past days (as some of you might know :flushed:). I just let go of everything else and put my entire focus on elixir :sweat_smile:

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I have been building some web components for text editing… and Phoenix integration.

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It is very much like fuzzing, to the point where lots of people come up with that analogy. There are two big differences. The big one is that mutation testing is mutating the code rather than the data. Another one is that mutation testing generally isn’t random – most tools apply all the mutations they know how to.

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Working on a guide to allow anyone to build a Phoenix app that can handle unlimited number of sites on the same port 80 and 443:

You will build a Phoenix 360 web apps project, that will consist of three websites:

  • app.local - will be the main web app and the only one that runs a web server.
  • links.local - the standalone website that will also be available at app.local/_links.
  • notes.local - the standalone website that will also be available at app.local/_notes.

The web server for app.local will also serve the requests for links.local and notes.local, and will dispatch(not redirect or forward) any request to app.local/_links and app.local/_notes into the same application that runs links.local and notes.local respectively.

This guide also has a Phoenix Security Hardening section in order to solve some security concerns around the defaults in Phoenix.

Also, contains a section with LetsEncrypt automation for localhost and production with this library:

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Microcontrollers. All the microcontrollers! Arduino, Adafruit Metro, Micro:Bit, etc!
Been really fun doing projects again. Just ordered a Raspberry Pi Pico. I’ve even managed to finish some projects in a semi-permanent form with Arduino. Mostly IoT stuff. “If it blinks, it should Tweet”.

Currently honing my Elixir skills by working on my second Elixir/Phoenix project. The first was a Digital Signage board that displays a simulates stock price, exchange rate, news updates, and video playback that can all be updated in realtime.

Reading about Spring Web MVC and Webflux. Webflux is Spring’s implementation for non-blocking reactive streams. I recently rewrote my backend service from NodeJs to Spring Boot and will use that service as my “playground”. I’m planning on converting my UI exposed endpoints to reactive functional endpoints using Webflux all the way to the Mongo datasource. That way I’ll be ready for the millions of users who want to see what book I am currently reading … :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: