PragProg’s Medium Posts

So you want to write a book? Read Dave Thomas’s insightful advice on our Medium feed!

Happy PragProgWriMo!

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Faraz Kelhini (@Faraz ) writes about using the new AggregateError in JavaScript, enabling you to see multiple errors in a single Error. It’s an exciting technology that’s popping up in modern browsers.

If you enjoyed this article, you may also like Faraz Kelhini’s book, Modern Asynchronous JavaScript, now out in beta. Modern Asynchronous JavaScript gives you an arsenal of tools to build programs that always respond to user requests, recover quickly from difficult conditions, and deliver maximum performance.

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Trying to pick a topic for #PragProgWriMo? Margaret Eldridge has ideas for you!

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This seems ripe for a title generator, like "#{random_intro} #{random_number} #{random_subject}s for your #{random_context}", coming up with things like “The Top 37 Data Structures for your Home Office” or “The 23 Most Efficient Machine Learning Algorithms for Freelance Photographers”. :wink:

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Learn how to use Filter, FlatMap and GroupBy in Kotlin in this hands-on article by Michael Fazio (@mfazio23) on today’s Medium feed. Michael applies these transformations to batting statistics in the “Android Batting League”.

With Kotlin and Jetpack, Android development is now smoother and more enjoyable than ever before. Dive right in by developing two complete Android apps. Come build Android apps the modern way with Kotlin and Jetpack.

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Join the marvelous Johanna Rothman (@jrothman) as she shares the secret of “Leadership Tip Number One”, or why you should always tell the truth even when you’re embarrassed.

Be sure to check out all of Johanna’s books from Prag!

https://pragprog.com/search/?q=johanna+rothman

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A good technical book uses a narrative flow placing the reader as the hero of its journey. Dave Thomas (@pragdave) writes about that Hero’s Journey in today’s Medium Post.

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Chris Pine (@chrispine) explores how you can use the planet Mercury to change the way your program works

Chris is the author of Learn to Program, Third Edition. Computers are everywhere, and being able to program them is more important than it has ever been. But since most books on programming are written for other programmers, it can be hard to break in. At least it used to be. Chris Pine will teach you how to program. You’ll learn to use your computer better, to get it to do what you want it to do.

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Remote work benefits come at a price. If we spend too much time away from interacting with other humans, it may have a detrimental effect on our mental health and our happiness, writes James Stanier (@jstanier)

The office isn’t as essential as it used to be. Flexible working hours and distributed teams are replacing decades of on-site, open-plan office culture. Wherever you work from nowadays, your colleagues are likely to be somewhere else. No more whiteboards. No more water coolers. And certainly no Ping-Pong. So how can you organize yourself, ship software, communicate, and be impactful as part of a globally distributed workforce? We’ll show you how. It’s time to adopt a brand new mindset. Remote working is here to stay. Come and join us.

Join Effective Remote Work’s beta at PragProg

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Do the right thing, even when It feels uncomfortable, writes Johanna Rothman (@jrothman) . People may intend to act one way but don’t always act according to their intentions.

Johanna Rothman writes about practical ways to lead and manage. Check out her many titles available from PragProg.

https://pragprog.com/search/?q=johanna+rothman

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Dave Thomas discusses the Dreyfus Model of Skills Acquisition, a psychological model explaining the process by which people gain experience when learning a new skill in today’s Medium post.

The PragProg journey began with Dave Thomas and Andy Hunt writing The Pragmatic Programmer, which is now available in this twentieth-anniversary edition

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Know your audience and write to them, explains Dave Thomas in today’s Medium post about using a target profile as you write. “Stop at the end of every paragraph and poll your imaginary friends. Ask each, in turn, a couple of questions: ‘Did that make sense?’ and ‘What questions or comments do you have?’”

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Johanna Rothman (@jrothman) teaches managers to use “No” as a complete sentence. Instead of always adding work to your already full load, she explores how to value the new task against your current commitments.

Read Johanna’s books about managing and leadership. She writes about techniques to create effective work environments.

https://pragprog.com/search/?q=johanna+rothman

Her titles are also available in print, available from booksellers around the world.

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What do managers do? Gather information, make decisions, encourage action, and exemplify the work ethic you seek to create according to today’s write-up by James Stanier (@jstanier)

The office isn’t as essential as it used to be. Flexible working hours and distributed teams are replacing decades of on-site, open-plan office culture. Wherever you work from nowadays, your colleagues are likely to be somewhere else. No more whiteboards. No more water coolers. And certainly no Ping-Pong. So how can you organize yourself, ship software, communicate, and be impactful as part of a globally distributed workforce? Let James Stanier show you how. It’s time to adopt a brand new mindset. Remote working is here to stay. Come and join us.

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Dave Thomas (@pragdave) writes, “The voice of a book has to be your voice. It has to be genuine; it has to be you. This is probably the most difficult challenge an author faces on a new book project.”

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Write a genetic algorithm using Nx (numerical definitions in Elixir) with this hands-on tutorial by Sean Moriarity (@seanmor5). There’s a livebook link so you can follow along with the post.

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David Muller (@davidmuller) dives into Python’s namedtuple function to create immutable bags of constants.

Developers power their projects with Python because it emphasizes readability, ease of use, and access to a meticulously maintained set of packages and tools. The language itself continues to improve with every release: writing in Python is full of possibility. But to maintain a successful Python project, you need to know more than just the language. You need tooling and instincts to help you make the most out of what’s available to you. Use David Muller’s Intuitive Python as your guide to help you hone your skills and sculpt a Python project that can stand the test of time.

In print from world-wide independent booksellers.

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Herbert Wolverson (@herbert) shows you how to run your Rust games in a browser by compiling to Web Assembly (WASM) in this medium write-up. Enjoy this bonus content from Hands-on Rust

What better way to learn than by making games? With Rust, you have a shiny new playground where your game ideas can flourish. Read the best-selling Hands-on Rust as an ebook or purchase a print copy from your favorite book sellers.

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Brian MacDonald (@bmacdonald) discusses knowing your scope and your audience when you set out to write.

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